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Deep indexing supplementary data files

June 20th, 2015 | Posted by rmounce in Conservation Hackathon | Content Mining | Hack days

To prove my point about the way that supplementary data files bury useful data, making it utterly indiscoverable to most, I decided to do a little experiment (in relation to text mining for museum specimen identifiers, but also perhaps with some relevance to the NHM Conservation Hackathon):

I collected the links for all Biology Letters supplementary data files. I then filtered out the non-textual media such as audio, video and image files, then downloaded the remaining content.

A breakdown of file extensions encountered in this downloaded subset:

763 .doc files
543 .pdf files
109 .docx files
75 .xls files
53 .xlsx files
25 .csv files
19 .txt files
14 .zip files
2 .rtf files
2 .nex files
1 .xml file
1 “.xltx” file

I then converted some of these unfriendly formats into simpler, more easily searchable plain text formats:

 

Now everything is properly searchable and indexable!

In a matter of seconds I can find NHM specimen identifiers that might not otherwise be mentioned in the full text of the paper, without actually wasting any time manually reading any papers. Note, not all the ‘hits’ are true positives but most are, and those that aren’t e.g. “NHMQEVLEGYKKKYE” are easy to distinguish as NOT valid NHM specimen identifiers:

 

Perhaps this approach might be useful to the PREDICTS / LPI teams, looking for species occurrence data sets?

I don’t know why figshare doesn’t do deep indexing by default – it’d be really useful to search the morass of published supplementary data that out there!